Wiki does a good job in going over a brief history of how the WCF came about. Basically to provide official documents for the reformation of the state-run Church of England: http://en.wikipedia.org/w...nster_Confession_of_Faith … Since it was for a state-run church it makes sense to that it needed to be ratified by the state. England prescribed to it early on with one brief period of time when the British monarchy reestablished power and implemented Anglican episcopacy…, but when William of Orange came into power he sanctioned the WCF again ...

The qualification of WCF 31:2 limited the powers of the civil magistrate to call assemblies to the cases of churches not organized or constituted in government. The American revision of WCF 23:3 intended to move the confessional position of American Presbyterianism from the "establishment principle" (church-state) to "voluntaryism," (independency) and to secure the church from unlawful government interference.


I didn't know the WCF was unpopular (not the case here), but if it is, I wouldn't think it was unpopular for a state-church reason, but because of our postmodern culture doing away with it the importance of history, authority …


In Christ,
5 Solas
Last Edited By: 5 Solas Jan 9 09 11:43 AM. Edited 2 times.